User Friendly Computer Station

User Friendly Computer Station

Having a user friendly computer station has high importance for a healthy work space.

Make Your Work Station User Friendly

To be a happy camper, your workplace must be user friendly and you need to pay attention to creature comforts. You will get more work done, you will be happier and you will have a more pleasant attitude. The long day will be more of a joy.

The turtle neck posture

The turtle-neck posture will eventually cause neck and shoulder pain. Your first task is to place your head where it is balanced upon your neck. This means to not have your head jutting forward like a turtle in order to see the computer monitor. Everyone who has a monitor that is spaced further than reading distance (about 14 inches) from his/her eyes needs to be thinking about getting a pair of “computer glasses.” They cost about the same as a pair of regular glasses. These glasses must be designed to permit clear reading at whatever the distance happens to be. Most computer monitors are placed at about 18 to 20 inches from the user’s eyes. That causes the user to push his head forward to properly read the screen. The result is neck injuries and spinal column misalignment.

Regular reading glasses or bifocals will not solve this problem. They are designed for reading and that is about 14 inches from the eyes. The problem will also result in eyestrain and well as fatigued shoulder and neck muscles.
Don’t be like a praying mantis.

User Friendly Computer Station

When setting at your desk your elbows must be supported and your wrists straight and they need to be relaxed. That is why chairs have arms. Arm, shoulder and wrist tension may be the cause of much of our carpel tunnel problems—at least these awkward positions may certainly be adding to the problem—it is best to avoid them.

Any movement of a bone or muscle will have an effect on the spinal column and the pelvic girdle that supports and lends automation to your body. When you raise an arm the backbone and the pelvis must move to counterbalance the weight replacement. This is done by those tiny little myofascial muscles within your big ones that are totally out of your control. You can bully these bones and muscles around but the price is fatigue and damage.

Keep in mind that the country blacksmith always worked at the level of his knuckles. If he raises his arms his pelvic girdle must tilt back and his lower and upper spine will also be distorted so that his body can maintain balance. As a computer operator you are like the country blacksmith in the office. For this reason, you need a User Friendly Computer Station

Don’t crane your neck

Place your feet evenly on the floor. Your feet must be under the desk to permit your fingers to reach the keyboard. Your body must be close enough to have your eyes at the needed distance from the screen and your head erect. The screen needs to be at or near your eye level. A tall person and a short person must have a means of adjusting the screen height to be user friendly.

Your chair height is extremely important

Make sure you have the right chair height in your user friendly computer station. Whether in a car, airplane, or driving a forklift or truck, you need to pay attention to seat height in relation to the floor. If the seat is to high the blood vessels that are at the back of your lower thigh will be restricted—and in the case of a long plane ride you may bring on blood clots and other problems. While setting, slide your hand under your thigh and between your leg and the seat, just above your knee. The lower part of your inner thigh muscle must be free of the seat while your feet are on the floor. Something so simple as placing a book under each foot may solve the problem.  Don’t restrict the blood flow in your lower extremities—you will live longer.

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